Yanagawa 柳川 – water water everywhere

It’s water water everywhere!
https://jezbraithwaite.blog/2020/01/06/firth-of-forth-water-water-everywhere-9/

Yanagawa (柳川) is known for its hundreds of kilometers of canals and hence its name “city of water” in Japan. Guided cruise along its canals is one of the top tourist activity when visiting this city in Fukuoka Prefecture, Kyushu. A photo (1st one below) was taken outside the ruins of the Yanagawa Castle built in Eiroku Period (1558-1570).

The cruise is roughly an hour so like me you may become very hungry … not to worry! Unagi no Seiro-mushi (eel rice steamed in a basket) is one of the specialties of Yanagawa. In fact there’re a few eel rice restaurants once you alight the canal cruise. Below 👇🏻 is the city’s website where you’ll find lots of information on the canal cruise and list of eel rice restaurants. Enjoy 😉

http://www.yanagawa-net.com/eng/

Delight(s) – word ending in light

Taiyaki

Since I was a kid I loved this dessert. It was a snack after piano lessons I looked forward to.

Called Taiyaki 鯛焼き, (lit. ‘baked sea bream’) is a Japanese fish-shaped cake. The most common filling is red bean paste that is made from sweetened azuki beans.

It is a classic street vendor snack in Japan and that warmth you hold in your hands of freshly baked taiyaki is indescribable!

Although traditionally eaten freshly baked, if you’re in Japan and feel like a cold dessert, head to the nearest 711 to find the cold version. It tastes super good. The white dough is slightly chewy and the custard inside is just super! Each are sold individually wrapped. I’ve attached the screenshot from 711 Japan for you.

Enjoy 😊

Delight(s) – word ending in light by The Light of B photo challenge. Yes Taiyakis delights me!

Note 711 photo not for the challenge! Thanks 😊

Screenshot from 711 Japan

https://beckybofwinchester.com/2020/01/01/january-light-1/

Japanese persimmons 柿 are in season!

If you are in Japan in autumn, it’s hard to miss this bright orange fruit – persimmon, known to the Japanese as kaki or 柿 in kanji (written the same in Chinese). This picture was taken at Nara park last week, famous for its sacred deer sanctuary (in fact there is a deer right beside the persimmon tree☺️)

The trees usually loose their leaves when they bear fruits
This species is slightly oblong in shape

Persimmons are packed with Vitamin A and C. And they’re loved for their sweetness and versatility as a fruit or dessert. As a fruit, I like them slightly hard, almost like a crunchy apple texture. I also like them as desserts and snacks. What about you?

Hanging them to dry to make traditional persimmon desserts (an example below)
I usually buy this at the supermarket, they make a great snack (sweet and chewy) with green tea.

https://wp.me/paXtca-cU